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Evers pardons 9 more, raising total to 65

Gov. Tony Evers pardoned nine more people this week, raising the total number of people he’s pardoned to 65.

The Governor’s Pardon Advisory Board heard from applicants virtually on Aug. 18 and recommended candidates for pardon to Evers.

On Tuesday, his office announced that Evers pardoned the following nine people:

  • Patrick Dell, now 45, was 19 when he was caught selling marijuana. He now owns his own business in Wausau, where he lives with his family.
  • Larry Fayerweather, now 55, was 19 when he cashed forged checks that he stole from a family friend. He is now married with children and grandchildren. He is eager to hunt with his grandkids. He now lives in Canon City, Colorado.
  • Matthew Brunner, now 34, was 21 years old when he was caught dealing marijuana. He works as an electrical systems technician in the Green Bay area, where he lives with his wife and two children.
  • Markeila McCarter, now 45, was 21 when she used someone else’s credit card at a department store. She now has two daughters and lives in Kankakee, Illinois, and works as a nurse health aide. She hopes to work in childcare, which was not possible previously given her conviction.
  • Kimberly Schillo, now 50, wrote worthless checks over 25 years ago. She works as an administrative assistant to support her children and lives in Milwaukee.
  • Tonya Miller, now 51,was a young mother when she struck her daughter as punishment nearly 26 years ago. She has since taken parenting classes and gotten an education. She lives in Chicago.
  • Jesse Gleason, now 30, was 19 when he was caught selling cocaine. He has since become a welder. He lives in Schofield with his wife and child.
  • Brady Gibney, now 27, was 17 when he broke into a gas station and stole cigarettes. He has since obtained a bachelor’s degree and works in the manufacturing sector. He lives in Delavan.
  • Richard Walker, now 33, was 19 when he got into a fight with another young man. He lives in Burnett with his wife and children.

The Pardon Advisory Board held another virtual meeting on Tuesday morning. Members heard from applicants and then met in closed conference to make their recommendations.

The Wisconsin Constitution grants the governor the power to pardon individuals convicted of a crime. A pardon is an official act of forgiveness that restores some of the rights that are lost when someone is convicted of a felony, including the right to own a gun, serve on a jury, hold public office and hold certain professional licenses. A pardon does not result in an expungement.

About Michaela Paukner, mpaukner@wislawjournal.com

Michaela Paukner is the legal reporter for the Wisconsin Law Journal. She can be reached at (414) 225-1825 or by email at mpaukner@wislawjournal.com.

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