Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility

Mock trial sets Frost on career path

By: Jerry Huffman//September 22, 2016//

Mock trial sets Frost on career path

By: Jerry Huffman//September 22, 2016//

Listen to this article
Jacob Frost - Boardman & Clark (Staff photo by Kevin Harnack)
Jacob Frost – Boardman & Clark (Staff photo by Kevin Harnack)

Jacob Frost knew he was destined to become an attorney when, in his first trial, he helped “convict” Christopher Columbus of crimes against humanity.

Frost was in the eighth grade and had just aced an important project for social studies class.

Some 18 years later, Frost looks back on that mock trial and now realizes how the experience changed his life.

“Up until that moment I was going to be a computer programmer,” Frost said, “but I found something more exciting that day.”

As a sixth-year associate at Boardman & Clark, Frost’s commitment both to his clients and community define his work as a lawyer. So much so, the particular case that prompted his colleagues to nominate him as an Up and Coming attorney might have been considered routine by most, but not for the young lawyer from Rudolph.

Frost had so thoughtfully written a brief advancing a client’s arguments in a family-law case that she broke down in tears.

“We were fighting for her side of the story in a divorce case,” said Frost, “and we were able to truly capture her contributions to the family, which was important for her. It meant a lot that she was so touched by something I had written.”

Frost and his wife, Nichole, a sonography student, chase their professional pursuits even while raising their daughters, Elycia and Madisen, and a newborn son, Thieran. Frost also devotes some time to serving as a secretary of the Board for Access to Independence, a Madison-area organization that provides resources, services and advocacy to the disabled. In addition, he volunteers with the Community Around the Children’s Hospital in Madison, as well as a full slate of professional legal committees.

“I love learning something new from every case,” said Frost, “and the responsibility of helping our clients work through challenging situations.”

Polls

Should Wisconsin Supreme Court rules be amended so attorneys can't appeal license revocation after 5 years?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Legal News

See All Legal News

WLJ People

Sea all WLJ People

Opinion Digests