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Who Should Stay And Who Should Go?

You're a federal prosecutor in Chicago, starting a trial against a Yale-educated, African-American consulting firm executive who used his firm's payroll software to add $68,000 to his paychecks over four months in 2000. The defendant claims he meant to pay ...

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Medical images at your fingertips

Attorneys that specialize in Personal Injury or medical issues usually have an extensive collection of medical resources. For others looking for medical images, a great place to start is the Medical Image Databases on the Internet maintained by University of ...

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When women judge women

Personal injury plaintiffs' lawyers have often told me they hope for female jurors — unless the plaintiff is a woman. Women judge other women harshly, the theory goes. The demographics of Anita Hill Ever since the Clarence Thomas hearings, when ...

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Uniform laws

In an earlier post, I listed tips to improve search results (read here). One suggestion was to “start with the right engine.” We often run our search in board spectrum engines such as Google when a specialized search engine or ...

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Let the Sun Shine In!

It’s called “insanely useful web sites” and that is just what it is! The Sunlight Foundation has a web page dedicated to government transparency. Sites listed monitor legislative activity, campaign contributions, legislative proceedings, government contracts, DOJ documents, and much more. ...

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Do you have a form for that?

I wonder how many forms the average law firm fills out in a week. It amazes me just how many exist. Regularly used forms are easy to find, but where do you look when in search of something new? Sure, ...

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Constitution Finder

The University of Richmond maintains a wonderful website called the “Constitution Finder.” It is a database of the constitutions, charters, amendments, etc. from several hundred countries. The site design is a clean, easy to use interface. Once the country of ...

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Great Access to Scholarly Articles

Many launch their research by reading journal articles. Scholarly pieces can offer insight into a new area, identify seminal cases or issues, or provide much needed analysis. I rely on a few quality sites for full-text articles. One worth bookmarking ...

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Site offers government abbreviations and acronyms

Library websites are often times a gold mine. I admire my colleagues’ efforts to bring quality information to the public. One such find is the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Library’s Abbreviations & Acronyms of the U.S. Government. It is an ...

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A different map search engine

Most of us utilize Mapquest, Yahoo!, or Google for our primary map searching tool. Each offers wonderful features, like Mapquest’s Gas Prices link. However, I would like to suggest another site to check out. Have you tried Metrobot? I use ...

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Wisconsin, where juries matter

I often find myself writing about cases where jury trials were messed up, from badly to horribly, and appellate courts forgave — or didn’t see — the problem. “This case must be retried on facts”There’s been a run of exceptions ...

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Here's how to pick alternates … next time

A Seventh Circuit opinion Dec. 20 requires a quick break from Deliberations's holiday break. United States v. Mendoza instructs trial courts in the Seventh Circuit on how to, and how not to, select alternate jurors in criminal trials. Alternates at ...

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The beauty of advanced search

Everyone loves the information available on the Internet. Everyone hates pages of irrelevant hits. One possible way to reduce retrieving useless results is to use the “advanced search” option offered by some engines. By starting out on this “Advanced” page, ...

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How do you say fifth amendment?

A single word can make a big difference, especially when the word is the main noun in a critical jury instruction. This week Mark Bennett began and Jamie Spencer continued a conversation about the pattern instruction Texas judges give when ...

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New blog offers research tips

Welcome! The genesis of this blog was a conversation I had with two fellow law librarians. With the new design of the Wisconsin Law Journal website, we discussed the importance of librarians sharing their knowledge with those attorneys and legal ...

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Tips for tracking down toy info

Whether you are researching toys for a legal matter or as a parent (it is the holiday season), two common issues are safety and age appropriateness. Check out these websites to assist in your quest. The first stop for most ...

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Judge Posner And The Jury Trial

There's no judge quite like the Seventh Circuit's Richard Posner. Very few judges have a Facebook fan club, for example ("Richard Posner for Philosopher King," they call themselves; Judge Alex Kozinski has a fan club there too). Judge Posner's opinions ...

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The grim power of grim evidence

Criminal and personal injury defense lawyers, pencils ready. Next time you ask a judge to keep gory pictures and other disturbing material out of evidence, cite David Bright. "Jurors presented with gruesome evidence, such as descriptions or images of torture ...

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Welcome, Mortgage Meltdown Blog

My partners Laura Gramling Perez, Chris Ware, and Ellen Brostrom, with help from a growing number of our colleagues, have unveiled a blog on all things related to the subprime mortgage crisis. It's called Mortgage Meltdown, and it covers everything ...

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Expect Less From Your Jury Consultant

Every once in awhile you see a "distrust" poll, ranking professions according to how much or how little people trust them. In the most recent Gallup Honesty/Ethics in Professions poll in December 2006, nurses ranked highest with 84% of respondents ...

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JURY NOTES FROM ELSEWHERE, OCTOBER 29

Jury talk seems to be everywhere lately. 1. When you can't handle the truth. "[T]here is enormous freedom in trying the impossible case," says Scott Greenfield of Simple Justice in "Loser Truth," a long post about what to do when ...

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State v. Hubbard: Defining

Read it aloud, and it sounds like any other Court of Appeals opinion: measured, calm, a little dull. But in that quiet tone, District II reached out last week to say that juries' questions about the law ought to be ...

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What They'll Never Tell You

Good lawyers know how much you can learn about jurors if you ask the right questions in voir dire. Really good lawyers know how much you'll never learn, no matter how perfect your questions are. Often — maybe always — ...

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Anne Reed Bio

Anne Reed is a trial lawyer and jury consultant in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She is a shareholder at Reinhart Boerner Van Deuren, SC, where she represents business clients in litigation, and assists lawyers preparing for trial through Reinhart's Trial Science Institute. ...

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