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Ardell W. Skow

By: WISCONSIN LAW JOURNAL STAFF//March 8, 2010//

Ardell W. Skow

By: WISCONSIN LAW JOURNAL STAFF//March 8, 2010//

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When it comes to personal injury cases, attorney Ardell “Del” W. Skow takes them personally.

In one respect, he works to obtain a successful outcome for his clients, but he also wants to connect with each one as individuals.

That approach has sustained his civil practice for more than 40 years, first in Baldwin, and more recently in New Richmond at Doar, Drill & Skow SC.

“I’ve always looked forward to visiting with a new client and explore new avenues to successfully handle a case for them,” he said.

Skow has tried more than 120 cases dealing with injuries caused by automobiles, motorcycles, small planes, farming equipment, medical devices and dogs, just to name a few.

And he has a particular fondness for one that wasn’t necessarily his most lucrative, but nevertheless one of his most rewarding.

He successfully defended a medical malpractice claim involving a 2-year-old who had developed meningitis and also had significant hearing loss.

“I saw that little guy in his OshKosh B’Gosh overalls for the first time and every year for the last 15, his family sends me a picture of him,” said Skow, who still gets emotional recalling the case.

While Skow has won his share of multi-million dollar liability cases in his career, he has always relished a “good old-fashioned” negligence case.

“Something common sense like a guy who was cutting trees that fell the wrong way,” he said.

Win or lose, Skow said the aspect of trying a case he anticipates most is summation.

He prides himself on being able to know a client’s case in detail and have facts on the tip of his tongue.

“After I’ve prepared a case and did my very best trying it, I love to sum it all up,” Skow said.

But he said the time that follows can be the most nerve racking.

“The scariest part is from the time you hear that knock of the gavel, until you know what the answer is from a jury,” he said.

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