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Author Archives: Dan Shaw, dshaw@wislawjournal.com

Sessions expands program to combat crime on tribal lands

BOBBY CAINA CALVAN Associated Press HELENA, Mont. (AP) — U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions sought Tuesday to deepen ties with Native Americans by allowing more tribal nations to tap into national anti-crime databases. Sessions discussed the change along with other policies meant to help tribal authorities combat crime on reservations stretching from the Puget Sound area of Washington state to the ...

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Judge knocks down right-to-work provision

A federal judge smacked down part of Wisconsin’s right-to-work law last week, but not in a way that is likely to be of long-term benefit to unions. In a decision handed down on Dec. 27, Judge William Conley of the Western District of Wisconsin found that a provision in Wisconsin’s so-called right-to-work law comes into conflict with the federal Labor ...

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Wisconsin sues over federal nitrous oxide rule

Wisconsin is suing the Environmental Protection Agency over a relatively new federal rule that state officials contend would unfairly force in-state power plants to reduce their emissions of nitrous oxide to protect downwind states. The suit stems from the Obama Administration’s adoption earlier this year of a revision to the federal Cross-State Air Pollution Rule. The change gives Wisconsin and ...

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DOJ files brief in right-to-work appeal

State lawyers filed their first brief Wednesday in their appeal of a Dane County Judge’s decision to strike down Wisconsin’s right-to-work law. Department of Justice lawyers used the filing to argue against various unions’ contention that the state’s right-to-work law deprives them of property. The law became the subject of a court challenge filed last year by Wisconsin State AFL-CIO, United ...

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High court to take ‘substantial fault’ case

The Wisconsin Supreme Court has agreed to take up a case looking at whether a relatively new law should prevent a woman from receiving unemployment benefits after she was fired for committing a number of errors while working as a Walgreens cashier.

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High court to hand down decision in home-rule case

A Wisconsin Supreme Court’s ruling scheduled for release Thursday promises to further define how much control local governments have over their own affairs even when state lawmakers act to strip them of some of that authority.

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Schimel suing over ozone rules

Wisconsin justice officials announced Monday that they have joined other states in a challenge of federal ozone limits that opponents contend will discourage employers from moving to places where the new standards fall most heavily on businesses.

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State expects 40 percent turnout for April election

State officials are estimating that voter turnout in the April 5 statewide election will be 40 percent. The state’s Government Accountability Board said if the predictions comes true, it would mark the highest turnout seen in a Wisconsin presidential primary since 1980. Forty-five percent of the electorate then turned out to vote in that election. To get to a 40 ...

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