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Waukesha County residents mount 2nd stay-at-home lawsuit

Protesters gather for a rally against Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers' extended stay-at-home order at the Wisconsin State Capitol on, April 24. (Amber Arnold/Wisconsin State Journal via AP)

Protesters gather for a rally against Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers’ extended stay-at-home order at the Wisconsin State Capitol on, April 24. (Amber Arnold/Wisconsin State Journal via AP)

By TODD RICHMOND
Associated Press

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Although all eyes are on Republican legislators’ attempt to derail Gov. Tony Evers’ stay-at-home order in the state Supreme Court, two Waukesha County residents have quietly mounted their own challenge alleging the mandate violates their constitutional rights to worship, protest and travel.

Jere’ Fabick and Larry Chapman filed a lawsuit with the Supreme Court on Monday. Fabick is a member of the board of directors of The Heartland Institute, an Illinois-based conservative think tank. Chapman is a member of the Lakewood Baptist Church in Pewaukee. Their arguments differ substantially from the GOP lawmakers’ challenge.

The Republican legislators have attacked the process Evers used to issue the order, arguing that his administration lacks the statutory authority to unilaterally issue such a broad order. They say it amounts to an administrative rule that requires legislative approval. They have asked the court to issue an injunction blocking the order.

Fabick and Chapman are challenging the order on its merits, arguing that central sections are blatantly unconstitutional.

Chapman alleges that language limiting religious gatherings to nine or fewer people violates his right to freedom of religion. The limit has prevented Lakewood from holding in-person Sunday services and distributing communion, he says. Virtual services don’t fulfill the Bible’s call for in-person worship, and many elderly members can’t use such services, he adds.

Fabick, meanwhile, alleges that the order limits his free speech and travel rights. According to the lawsuit, he wants to engage in protests against the order but the travel ban prevented him from joining one in Madison on April 24.

“Even a public health crisis does not give the State executive authorities license to impose measures that are arbitrary and irrational, or that patently violate our most sacred constitutional rights,” the lawsuit said.

The filing doesn’t seek to invalidate the entire order. Instead it asks the justices to block sections limiting the size of religious gatherings, ordering everyone in the state to stay home and placing prohibitions on travel. It asks the court to leave other social-distancing requirements in the order alone.

The case has been largely overshadowed by the legislators’ lawsuit. Fabick and Chapman filed it late Monday afternoon, just hours before the justices were scheduled to hear oral arguments in the GOP lawsuit. A ruling could come at any moment.

The court has given Evers’ administration until 4 p.m. Friday to file a response to Fabick and Chapman’s case, but still hasn’t decided whether to take it on. It could have a decent chance of gaining traction. Conservative justices who control the court 5-2 questioned the legality of the order during oral arguments in the legislators’ case.

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