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Tag Archives: Steven Avery

CRITIC’S CORNER: Weird science in Wisconsin courts

Cover image copyright AP Images.  Cover design by Nicole Sommer-Lecht.  Cover design copyright Prometheus Books.

Steven Avery was convicted of murder in 2007. At his trial, the state called numerous scientific experts to help seal his fate. Then, a few years later, Wisconsin adopted the stricter Daubert standard for the admissibility of expert testimony. Had this supposedly tougher standard been in effect earlier, how would it have affected Avery’s trial?

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CRITIC’S CORNER: Convicting Avery (and overturning Denny)

Steven Avery is the poster child for wrongful convictions. Avery was released from prison after spending nearly two decades behind bars for a rape that DNA evidence later proved he could not have committed. He is now serving a life sentence for killing Teresa Halbach on Oct. 31, 2005, and burning her body near the family's auto salvage lot in rural Manitowoc County. 
AP PHOTO/KIRK WAGNER, POOL

The wildly popular Netflix documentary “Making a Murderer” chronicles the two convictions of Steven Avery. The bulk of the documentary concentrated on Avery’s second case — his trial for the murder of Teresa Halbach — in which there was a great deal of evidence that someone else, other than Avery, committed the crime.

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Wrongful conviction, drunken driving bills left off Senate agenda (UPDATE)

The Wisconsin Senate is unlikely to take up bills that would outlaw so-called sanctuary cities for immigrants, increase compensation for the wrongly convicted and allow students to deduct debt from their income taxes when it convenes Tuesday for what's expected to be the last floor period of the two-year legislative session.

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Prosecutors, defense attorneys clash over interrogation techniques

Julius Kim, a criminal defense attorney with Brookfield-based Kim & LaVoy, used to train police officers when he was an assistant district attorney for Milwaukee County. He says he hopes that because more interrogations are being videotaped, courts will start to throw out confessions obtained using psychological techniques that affect whether a statement is, by law, voluntary. (Staff photo by Kevin Harnack)

If nothing else, the Netflix series “Making a Murderer” has put a spotlight on an unsettling practice that Julius Kim and other defense lawyers see all the time: The admission into evidence of statements gathered in coercive interrogations.

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